J Bieschke Events

Fabulous weddings and events in DC

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I had one of the most wonderful experiences today. A dear friend Sarah showed me the stunning, glamorous gown that her mother wore on her wedding day. Sarah had already found a dress, but wanted to find a way to incorporate this into her wedding. The dress also came with a cape which had lace applique trim and a stunning damask applique in lace in the middle.
I started with that piece as an inspiration, and placed it in the back of a bolero. I met with Daniela who is fabulous and designs out of Green and Blue in Dupont Circle. She loved the challenge and was thrilled to be working with the classic lace and silk gown. It was such a fantastic moment, where you really get to see someones dream and vision come to life before their eyes. This is exactly what I love most about planning weddings.

I had one of the most wonderful experiences today. A dear friend Sarah showed me the stunning, glamorous gown that her mother wore on her wedding day. Sarah had already found a dress, but wanted to find a way to incorporate this into her wedding. The dress also came with a cape which had lace applique trim and a stunning damask applique in lace in the middle.

I started with that piece as an inspiration, and placed it in the back of a bolero. I met with Daniela who is fabulous and designs out of Green and Blue in Dupont Circle. She loved the challenge and was thrilled to be working with the classic lace and silk gown. It was such a fantastic moment, where you really get to see someones dream and vision come to life before their eyes. This is exactly what I love most about planning weddings.

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I just got back from a visit to the really fabulous Whittemore house. It’s an antique mansion located in DC’s historic Dupont Circle. I loved the tasteful renovations - they are perfectly in keeping with the period, and make the house feel loved and current, especially the wainscoting and and the stunning hand carved ceiling. If you want to get a feeling of real classic glamor and luxury, try to imagine living in this house, now home to the National Democratic Women’s Club, with some pretty impressive members.
Their website is here: www.thewhittemorehouse.com

I just got back from a visit to the really fabulous Whittemore house. It’s an antique mansion located in DC’s historic Dupont Circle. I loved the tasteful renovations - they are perfectly in keeping with the period, and make the house feel loved and current, especially the wainscoting and and the stunning hand carved ceiling. If you want to get a feeling of real classic glamor and luxury, try to imagine living in this house, now home to the National Democratic Women’s Club, with some pretty impressive members.

Their website is here: www.thewhittemorehouse.com

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Fussy Old-fashioned Wedding Tradition Explained #2
The Groom Isn’t Allowed to See the Bride on the Day of the Wedding. (or else)
Begs the question, of course, “or else what?” Well, the tradition dates back to the arranged marriages of the dark ages (pre-1850). Especially among wealthy families from different cities, using marriage to create political ties, it was not uncommon for a bride and a groom to meet each other for the first time at the wedding ceremony! (Can you imagine?) He might be so appalled by her looks that he wouldn’t have agreed to the marriage. Terrifyingly enough, this is the same reason brides wear a veil until after the vows are exchanged.
I’m curious if there are gay couples who stick to this tradition? In my experience, although it’s sweet, it’s a little inconvenient - couples, gay or otherwise, who skip this, are able to take pictures before the ceremony, and join their guests for the cocktail hour.
(picture - of a couple with apparently a TON of extra time on their hands on the day of - courtesy of Chicago Wedding Blog)

Fussy Old-fashioned Wedding Tradition Explained #2

The Groom Isn’t Allowed to See the Bride on the Day of the Wedding. (or else)

Begs the question, of course, “or else what?” Well, the tradition dates back to the arranged marriages of the dark ages (pre-1850). Especially among wealthy families from different cities, using marriage to create political ties, it was not uncommon for a bride and a groom to meet each other for the first time at the wedding ceremony! (Can you imagine?) He might be so appalled by her looks that he wouldn’t have agreed to the marriage. Terrifyingly enough, this is the same reason brides wear a veil until after the vows are exchanged.

I’m curious if there are gay couples who stick to this tradition? In my experience, although it’s sweet, it’s a little inconvenient - couples, gay or otherwise, who skip this, are able to take pictures before the ceremony, and join their guests for the cocktail hour.

(picture - of a couple with apparently a TON of extra time on their hands on the day of - courtesy of Chicago Wedding Blog)

Filed under Wedding gay mairriage tradition etiquette

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Every line of text on your wedding invitation has a particular place and meaning. Today we’ll look at the line that actually invites people to your wedding. Typically preceeded by the names of the hostMr. and Mrs. John Smith request the pleasure of your companyGee, well, that’s nice of them! But wait, in what circumstances is this more appropriate than:request the honor of your presenceCouples often confuse these lines, thinking only that the latter represents more formality. However, there is a substantial difference. The second option is typically used only when the wedding (or ceremony) takes place on hallowed ground. In other words, the first option is preferred, but since you can’t request the pleasure of someone’s company in God’s house, you instead ask for the honor of their presence at a church, temple, synagogue, graveyard, etc. In a side note, you are more than welcome to use the British spelling “honour” instead of the American “honor” if you prefer - it sometimes feels more formal.

Invite is a Kate Spade for Crane & Co. design: www.Crane.com

Every line of text on your wedding invitation has a particular place and meaning. Today we’ll look at the line that actually invites people to your wedding. Typically preceeded by the names of the hostMr. and Mrs. John Smith request the pleasure of your company
Gee, well, that’s nice of them! But wait, in what circumstances is this more appropriate than:request the honor of your presenceCouples often confuse these lines, thinking only that the latter represents more formality. However, there is a substantial difference. The second option is typically used only when the wedding (or ceremony) takes place on hallowed ground. In other words, the first option is preferred, but since you can’t request the pleasure of someone’s company in God’s house, you instead ask for the honor of their presence at a church, temple, synagogue, graveyard, etc. In a side note, you are more than welcome to use the British spelling “honour” instead of the American “honor” if you prefer - it sometimes feels more formal.

Invite is a Kate Spade for Crane & Co. design: www.Crane.com

Filed under invitations wedding stationery etiquette formality

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Late summer always makes me think of being at the country, the smell of fresh hay, lilting flowers in the breeze. However, living among the city folk, one may want a rustic wedding, but one may not want a country wedding, as it were. So, how to do rustic, without doing country?
I think that the best way to achieve rustic glamour is to use country elements in very broad strokes - for example, consider the of the drapes and the lighting in the barn. (A real wedding from Martha Stewart weddings). Using the backdrop of the rustic barn, add elements of classic, traditional glamor to balance the rough hewn wood. Consider something like a vintage set of cake trays (these are from Whimsical Wonderland Weddings) for petit fours or macarons, balance the traditional, refined and almost stuffy against the unlacquered charm of simple barn doors.
Don’t scrimp on the dress - this wedding is about balancing contradictions. It’s important to make sure you have the soft, classic and elegant to make sure your wedding doesn’t end up with cowboy boots under a tea length dress. Think of taking classic New York and putting it in the country. Black tie would help.
Shephards hooks and mason jars from Style me Pretty. Strings of lights from Intimate Weddings. Green Bouquets take a classic shape and turns it on its head, from Wedding Flowers and Reception Ideas.  Lace gown image from PRLOG. 
Invitations from:

Late summer always makes me think of being at the country, the smell of fresh hay, lilting flowers in the breeze. However, living among the city folk, one may want a rustic wedding, but one may not want a country wedding, as it were. So, how to do rustic, without doing country?

I think that the best way to achieve rustic glamour is to use country elements in very broad strokes - for example, consider the of the drapes and the lighting in the barn. (A real wedding from Martha Stewart weddings). Using the backdrop of the rustic barn, add elements of classic, traditional glamor to balance the rough hewn wood. Consider something like a vintage set of cake trays (these are from Whimsical Wonderland Weddings) for petit fours or macarons, balance the traditional, refined and almost stuffy against the unlacquered charm of simple barn doors.

Don’t scrimp on the dress - this wedding is about balancing contradictions. It’s important to make sure you have the soft, classic and elegant to make sure your wedding doesn’t end up with cowboy boots under a tea length dress. Think of taking classic New York and putting it in the country. Black tie would help.

Shephards hooks and mason jars from Style me Pretty. Strings of lights from Intimate Weddings. Green Bouquets take a classic shape and turns it on its head, from Wedding Flowers and Reception Ideas.  Lace gown image from PRLOG.

Invitations from:

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Old fashioned wedding traditions explained (take1)
Double envelopes.
There was a time when the wealthy and respectable (not always the same thing) families from a particular city knew the better part of the other families within the same social echelon. (For further reading on this phenomenon, consider The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton). Consequently, invitations to social events, including but not exclusively weddings, were not sent through the post (mail) but were hand delivered by footmen. After being carefully engraved, the invitation and other enclosures were inserted into not one, but two envelopes. This tradition continues until today - but why?
The outer envelope carried the names of the chief residents of the house (typically the patriarch and his wife) and the mailing address associated with their domestic bliss. The footman delivered the invitation to the footman at the house of the recipient. The footman in turn removed the outer envelope which had by then been sullied by the dust and grime of Victorian streets and gave the invitation, to the housemaid who laid it with the (likely, countless) other invitations. It would have only the inner envelope, which has the social title and last names of the members of the household invited to the wedding. This envelope is typically lines with lovely papers and is usually not sealed.
There are few traditions so elegant that are still maintained from the Victorian era (who among you have calling cards?) and so I believe it should be used with any more formal invitations. If you’re concerned with the environmental impact, consider Crane & Co. (shown above) who uses exclusively recycled, non-post-consumer cotton, which is completely sustainable and further recyclable.

Old fashioned wedding traditions explained (take1)

Double envelopes.


There was a time when the wealthy and respectable (not always the same thing) families from a particular city knew the better part of the other families within the same social echelon. (For further reading on this phenomenon, consider The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton). Consequently, invitations to social events, including but not exclusively weddings, were not sent through the post (mail) but were hand delivered by footmen. After being carefully engraved, the invitation and other enclosures were inserted into not one, but two envelopes. This tradition continues until today - but why?

The outer envelope carried the names of the chief residents of the house (typically the patriarch and his wife) and the mailing address associated with their domestic bliss. The footman delivered the invitation to the footman at the house of the recipient. The footman in turn removed the outer envelope which had by then been sullied by the dust and grime of Victorian streets and gave the invitation, to the housemaid who laid it with the (likely, countless) other invitations. It would have only the inner envelope, which has the social title and last names of the members of the household invited to the wedding. This envelope is typically lines with lovely papers and is usually not sealed.

There are few traditions so elegant that are still maintained from the Victorian era (who among you have calling cards?) and so I believe it should be used with any more formal invitations. If you’re concerned with the environmental impact, consider Crane & Co. (shown above) who uses exclusively recycled, non-post-consumer cotton, which is completely sustainable and further recyclable.

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Happy 4th Y’all!
My partner and I are hosting very few friends for a little cookout at our townhouse downtown, and I threw a quick design together for the invite - I love using themes! Sticking with classic Americana and using the Red White and Blue is a blast. I love decorating when we’re easily able to reference classic themes, (flags, fireworks)  but modernize and make it your own.
Hope you all are doing something truly fabulous to celebrate the holiday!

Happy 4th Y’all!

My partner and I are hosting very few friends for a little cookout at our townhouse downtown, and I threw a quick design together for the invite - I love using themes! Sticking with classic Americana and using the Red White and Blue is a blast. I love decorating when we’re easily able to reference classic themes, (flags, fireworks)  but modernize and make it your own.

Hope you all are doing something truly fabulous to celebrate the holiday!